Dana 44 rear or 8.8

#1
My tj has a Dana 44 rear axle already. It needs most of the rear brakes replaced and I would prefer to upgrade to disk. It also needs axle seals. I priced the disk brake kit and have been weighing my options and was wondering if I would be better off just swapping an 8.8. Its an 02 sport 4.0 5 speed with 35's. It's used for weekend driving in nice weather and trail riding. I also am wanting to regear it and add a selectable locker. What's everyone's opinion?
 
#2
I would say 8.8 cause it's stronger and you can build it slowly over time while still being able to drive your jeep. I have similar situation and my plan is to find a cheap 8.8 and build it over time so I can learn and save money. I am subscribed to see what the more experienced folks say. Then either keep 44 for a spare or sell and recoup some of your 8.8 build money.

Till then, what are your plans for the jeep? Extreme off-roading or daily driver with some fun on the weekends and want it to look good?

If you haven't already done so do some searchs in the other jeep forums as this question has been asked many times. The more info and opinions you find the better off you will be. Good luck and keep us posted on what you decide and during the build.


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#3
Honestly the 44 and 88 are in the same strength category. If I was to invest money and time into a swap it would be for a way stronger axle then the both of them.
 
#4
I'd lean towards the 8.8. It's what I put in mine, and I bought it set up to bolt into my tj for $750. They're a great alternative since they can be found with our lug pattern, they're about an inch from our width, there's great aftermarket support, and they're pretty cheap to find. I've been beating on mine for about a year now with 0 problems. I've heard they'll hold up to 37s too.
 
#5
A stock 8.8 will hold up to trail abuse on 35s no problem. Add a Super 88 kit and you'll probably never have a problem with it, even if you go to 37s. I just put an 8.8 in the rear of mine and have no regrets about it. Between the disc brakes and the LSD, it was a no brainer.
 
#7
My tj has a Dana 44 rear axle already. It needs most of the rear brakes replaced and I would prefer to upgrade to disk. It also needs axle seals. I priced the disk brake kit and have been weighing my options and was wondering if I would be better off just swapping an 8.8. Its an 02 sport 4.0 5 speed with 35's. It's used for weekend driving in nice weather and trail riding. I also am wanting to regear it and add a selectable locker. What's everyone's opinion?
I recommend 8.8 if you have the time and money. Though the Dana 44 is a great axle the 8.8 is a tad beefier.
 
#8
I believe the Dana 44 is a better axle in stock to stock axle comparison.

Sure the 8.8 has slight advantage in ring gear size but the 44 has larger/higher spline count axles and are not retained by lowley c clips.
 
#9
I believe the Dana 44 is a better axle in stock to stock axle comparison.

Sure the 8.8 has slight advantage in ring gear size but the 44 has larger/higher spline count axles and are not retained by lowley c clips.
I have to disagree with you on this.

I own and have worked on both the 8.8 (the 31 spline disc brake explorer version and the 2011 5.0 Mustang version) and the TJ Rubicon D44s.

The 8.8 has a significantly larger tube diameter (3.25" vs. D44J 2.62") and the R&P gear set are larger and beefier.

The C-Clip issue is blown out of proportion, and a super 88 kit can be had cheap (eliminating these clips and widening/strengthening the axle).
 
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#10
So I bought an explorer 8.8 and plan to swap it shortly. I want a selectable locker as I do plan to drive it on the street from time to time and the Detroit in my mud truck is unnerving on slick roads. I have read that the Eaton e-locker has had some issues. I also read it had been redesigned to help the issues. I will probably either go arb or Eaton. Lets hear some opinions.
 
#11
So I bought an explorer 8.8 and plan to swap it shortly. I want a selectable locker as I do plan to drive it on the street from time to time and the Detroit in my mud truck is unnerving on slick roads. I have read that the Eaton e-locker has had some issues. I also read it had been redesigned to help the issues. I will probably either go arb or Eaton. Lets hear some opinions.
ARB or OX Lock IMO.
 
#12
I have to disagree with you on this.

I own and have worked on both the 8.8 (the 31 spline disc brake explorer version and the 2011 5.0 Mustang version) and the TJ Rubicon D44s.

The 8.8 has a significantly larger tube diameter (3.25" vs. D44J 2.62") and the R&P gear set are larger and beefier.

The C-Clip issue is blown out of proportion, and a super 88 kit can be had cheap (eliminating these clips and widening/strengthening the axle).
You may have misunderstood my comments a bit, Sock vs Stock without opening it up to install or replace a single part was the basis for my comments. I to have owned and worked on dozens of 8.8's from my younger years working in mustang specialized speed shops and than 25 + years of having owned and raced 8.8's in my own 5.0 Mustangs. It needs to be said that a majority of the 8.8's DO NOT have 31 spine axles, all the '"car" axles had 28 spline and it is not overblown a bit about the C-clip issue. I have seen first hand 8.8 & 7.5 axles that would break and walk out of the later disc brake SN-95 mustangs, it was also discovered back 20 + years ago the factory disc brake rears where weaker than the drum brake counter parts, these axles would often snap somewhere out by axle tubes ends, my 95 Cobra that barely made 300 hp broke two right side axles alone. Additionally you mention the axle tubes, one of the first agenda items for the rear when we built an 8.8 for a 500+ hp mustang (or a car with traction) was weld the axles tubes since only quarter sized spot weld retained them, up until recently I had a "bent" housing where the tube was pulled and twisted laying around till the wife asked my to take it to the scrap yard...

To summarize, both are fine axles and I have even installed an 8.8 in my old YJ but in my honest opinion i can't say one is stronger than the other stock vs stock.
 
#13
You may have misunderstood my comments a bit, Sock vs Stock without opening it up to install or replace a single part was the basis for my comments. I to have owned and worked on dozens of 8.8's from my younger years working in mustang specialized speed shops and than 25 + years of having owned and raced 8.8's in my own 5.0 Mustangs. It needs to be said that a majority of the 8.8's DO NOT have 31 spine axles, all the '"car" axles had 28 spline and it is not overblown a bit about the C-clip issue. I have seen first hand 8.8 & 7.5 axles that would break and walk out of the later disc brake SN-95 mustangs, it was also discovered back 20 + years ago the factory disc brake rears where weaker than the drum brake counter parts, these axles would often snap somewhere out by axle tubes ends, my 95 Cobra that barely made 300 hp broke two right side axles alone. Additionally you mention the axle tubes, one of the first agenda items for the rear when we built an 8.8 for a 500+ hp mustang (or a car with traction) was weld the axles tubes since only quarter sized spot weld retained them, up until recently I had a "bent" housing where the tube was pulled and twisted laying around till the wife asked my to take it to the scrap yard...

To summarize, both are fine axles and I have even installed an 8.8 in my old YJ but in my honest opinion i can't say one is stronger than the other stock vs stock.
I was talking stock to stock... Perhaps you misunderstood?

3.25" tube diameter is significantly stronger then 2.62"... STOCK TO STOCK

The gear set is also much beefier STOCK TO STOCK.

My point was that the rest of the weaknesses are EASY to circumvent, its certainly easier to eliminate C clips then change your tube diameter and your not changing the gear set for a beefier one. The C-Clip "problem" isn't likely to bite anyone right away if ever. If it does pop out it often times just falls to the bottom of the dif.

There are plenty of mild 600 HP+ 4,000 pound curb weight Coyote 5.0s running around on the 8.8, there are plenty of C-Clip 8.8s in use on these "mildly built" cars running deep 10 and high 9 second E/Ts. My buddies and I own some of them; I have spent a lot of time at the strip and the amount of failures certainly aren't overwhelming. Hell the bolt on N/A ones are seeing 400-450 WHP...

They stopped using 28 spline 8.8s on the Mustang GTs back in 2005 dude... lol.

Most of the later explorer axles with disc brakes that I have found have 31 spline axles (1995 and up lol)...

Welding the tubes to the housing isn't just practice on the 8.8 but is pretty well known, no news there and again not a big deal.
 
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